Tybee Beach’s “Indian Summer”

“INDIAN SUMMER never fails to remind us how splendid the weather can be….” — Adam W. Sweeting

Tybee Fishermen (c) 2011 James Byous | JByousPhoto.com. Used with permission.

“May be compared to a perpetual ‘Indian Summer'” | Tybee Fishermen Photo (c) JByousPhoto.com

Don’t you want to be at Lighthouse Inn beach lodging on beautiful Tybee Island, Georgia for your perpetual “Indian Summer”?  We are blessed in Georgia!  Just about year around the beach vacation days and nights are “tempered into a true deliciousness”, undisturbed soaking up Atlantic Ocean breezes on Georgia beaches, recapturing memories like not so long ago.

Historically in America, late autumn’s warm weather are the days of a good Indian Harvest (or Indian Corn Harvest), goose summer, or the French’s St. Martin’s summer. These are terms found in “The Old Farmer and His Almanack“. Typically splendid weather in New England’s Indian Summer can take place late September to mid November.

“In Georgia, ‘the climate is mild, equable, and in the highest degree salubrious. No more healthful region, I confidently assert, can be found anywhere, either in America or in Europe. The fall and winter are absolutely delightful and may be compared to a perpetual ‘Indian Summer’, the heat of the true summer being then tempered into a true deliciousness.'” -The Phrenological Journal and Life Illustrated, 1866

For autumnal reflection in music, Dave Brubeck’s “Indian Summer” CD will transport you to gentle times, reminiscently.  Georgia on my Mind is one of the titles.

WayWordRadio.org punctuates a few more facts. The spider’s filaments take their name from an old word for late autumn –’gosesomer’ a name that means ‘goose summer.’ Early November traditionally was the time when people feasted on fattened geese. In fact, an old German word for November literally translates as “geese month.”

It was in Indian Summer “by the middle of November next” when Brevet Second Lt. Robert E. Lee‘s first official orders brought him to “report to Maj. Samuel Babcock of the corps of Engineers for duty at Cockspur Island, in the Savannah River Ga.” [Source: CivilWar.com, By Rogers W. Young, Assistant Historical Technician, Branch of Historic Sites.]

Farm-to-table crops are grown in Georgia year around.  Georgia coast locals and beach vacationers dine at local Tybee Island restaurants, savoring the freshest Wild Georgia Shrimp, fish, and caviar.  The Georgia coast shrimping season usually opens the second or third week of June and continues at least through December 31.

“These Indian Summer Days, with all their peculiar peace,” Emily Dickinson wrote to her cousin in 1869, “remind me of those things that no one can disturb.” — Beneath the Second Sun: A Cultural History of Indian Summer (University of New Hampshire) by Adam W Sweeting.

We invite you to get away to Lighthouse Inn at the beach, Tybee Island, for your own Indian Summer this year or next on the Georgia coast!

For more information:

Lighthouse Inn, a Tybee Island beach house inn
Historic Tybee Beach Bed and Breakfast Cottage, Celebrating 100 Years!
tybeebb.com | lighthouseinn@bellsouth.net
16 Meddin Drive | Tybee Island | Georgia | USA 31328
(912) 786-0901 | Toll Free (866) 786-0901 | Twitter @Rockinporch | Facebook

Copyright (c) 2011 Sandy Traub/Lighthouse Inn.

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One Response to Tybee Beach’s “Indian Summer”

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